SSL certificate

digvijaybook

Account Disabled
For me, I will go with Go daddy. Also this is very cheap Single Domain SSL Certificate starts at $4.95 per year price from Google and amazon.
 
It depends on the level of validation and protection you want. The more expensive SSL's have much higher insurance cover, brand validation and security. You pay for what you get with them tbh
 

easyhostmedia

Well-known member
I get the validation angle, but the general public doesn't generally look past the lock icon.
yes, but as a business owner if you cant afford $6 to get a validated SSL then you dont take your business seriously.
Would you skimp on your house or car security or if you have business premises would you skimp of the security for the building.
 

Artashes

Administrator
Staff member
yes, but as a business owner if you cant afford $6 to get a validated SSL then you dont take your business seriously.
Would you skimp on your house or car security or if you have business premises would you skimp of the security for the building.
You missed the angle of Steve's post. He was talking about consumers not caring what SSL you have. As long as they see a secure site, that's all they care for.
 

easyhostmedia

Well-known member
You missed the angle of Steve's post. He was talking about consumers not caring what SSL you have. As long as they see a secure site, that's all they care for.
Yes a consumer will, but us as business owners need to look after our site and make sure any consumer details give on our sites can be as secure as possible and what is $6 to a business to give extra security and validation as i bet some consumers will look for the validation badge as having a free SSL does not say the site is genuine as a scammer with a fake Nike website will get a free SSL, but wont pay for an SSL
 

SenseiSteve

HD Moderator
Staff member
Yes a consumer will, but us as business owners need to look after our site and make sure any consumer details give on our sites can be as secure as possible and what is $6 to a business to give extra security and validation as i bet some consumers will look for the validation badge as having a free SSL does not say the site is genuine as a scammer with a fake Nike website will get a free SSL, but wont pay for an SSL
Of course, some consumers will investigate as there are no absolutes in business, but I'll lay odds 99.999% of consumers could care less, and I'm not saying that's a smart thing to do - just a reality.
 

easyhostmedia

Well-known member
Of course, some consumers will investigate as there are no absolutes in business, but I'll lay odds 99.999% of consumers could care less, and I'm not saying that's a smart thing to do - just a reality.
like 99.999% of home/vehicle break ins are by opportunists, but the more you pay for security the more protection you have. You should treat your website just like you would a physical store.. It is all about how you value your business and customer details on the type and level of security you place on your site. i spend 2 days a week as a volunteer with Citizens Advice in the UK and hear many stories of people being scammed from sites that show as being secured. The SSL industry could be changed next year as Visa are looking at only supporting sites with a min. OV SSL and if visa do this them mastercard would soon follow.
 

bigredseo

HD Community Advisor
Staff member
yes, but as a business owner if you cant afford $6 to get a validated SSL then you dont take your business seriously.
Would you skimp on your house or car security or if you have business premises would you skimp of the security for the building.
I disagree. This was something that we had posted and chatted about last year (or the year before). The advantage of actually buying something, since the encryption is the same.

We use the Free SSL on our site. I've yet to have a single person say "oh, you don't take the business seriously". We run several eCommerce sites, again, the same thing. We have HeatMaps on websites, and pretty much never see the mouse move off to the top left of a browser window.

As far as the "insurance" end of things, that only kicks in should someone actually crack the key - to date, there has never been a payout.
 
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